Participate in a Research Study 

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YOU can help advance understanding of OCD and body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRDs) by participating in a research study. The following programs are currently seeking recruits.

 

Vanderbilt University Department of Psychology study on how the brain processes emotion in individuals with OCD 

The study takes three hours to complete and pays $80 for full participation to both you and your family member. Tasks include a brief interview, questionnaires, and a scan of your brain will be taken using an MRI. Eligiblity criteria: One participant WITH OCD and one unaffected relative willing to participate. Eligible candidates have NONE of the following conditions: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI); bipolar disorder; attention-telated disorders (ADHD); substance abuse; pervasive developmental disorder; psychotic disorder.  If you are interested in participating, please call (615) 343-5476 or email Earl.Vandy@gmail.com. Eligibility will be further determined upon contact

 

American University Department of Psychology Online Studies for Adults (18+) with a BFRB 

Adults (age>18) who suffer from symptoms of hair pulling disorder (also known as trichotillomania), are invited to complete an online survey about symptoms, personality traits, and triggers that typically lead to hair pulling for you. If you consent to participate in this study, you will complete a series of anonymous questionnaires. The major purpose of the study is to help us refine a new measure of triggers for hair pulling, which may later prove useful for therapists who attempt to tailor intervention strategies to the individual hair puller. If you elect to participate you will have the option to be entered into a raffle for one of ten $50 gift cards. To learn more and participate, please click on this link.

 

Seeking Adults with Hair Pulling for an Online Survey of Symptoms and Pulling Styles and Triggers 

If you are an adult (age>18) and suffer from the symptoms of hair pulling disorder (also known as trichotillomania), you are invited to complete an online survey about your symptoms, personality traits, and the triggers that typically lead to hair pulling for you. This study is being conducted by the Department of Psychology at American University. If you consent to participate in this study, you will complete a series of anonymous questionnaires. The major purpose of the study is to help us refine a new measure of triggers for hair pulling, which may later prove useful for therapists who attempt to tailor intervention strategies to the individual hair puller. If you elect to participate you will have the option to be entered into a raffle for one of ten $50 gift cards. To learn more and participate, please click on this link

 

Social Concerns in Adults with Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs) 

We are currently examining the role of social concerns associated with body-focused repetitive behaviors via Qualtrics. Participants must be ages 18-60 and have any of the following BFRBs: compulsive hair pulling (trichotillomania); compulsive skin picking (excoriation); compulsive nail biting; compulsive nail picking; compulsive teeth grinding; compulsive cheek biting; other BFRB. All study procedures will be completed in an online survey via Qualtrics. All participants will be placed in a raffle drawing for a chance to win one of five $20 Amazon gift cards.
If you are interested, please contact us at (414) 229-5941, or email adl-ttm@uwm.edu for more details about the study.

 

Hair Pulling in Black College Students: Understanding Clinical Distress and Impairment in Symptom Expression Among Groups 

Looking for black female, undergraduate college students who pull hair on their body (scalp, eyebrow, eyelash, or hair growing for other parts of the body) for non-cosmetic reasons (meaning not related to grooming) and are at least 18 years of age to complete a survey on hair pulling, ethnicity, and anxiety. It will only take 20-30 minutes to complete. Every 30 participants will be entered into a raffle to win $100! If interested, please complete the survey by visiting the following link.

 

Seeking Adults with Hair Pulling for an Online Survey of Childhood and Developmental Experiences in Trichotillomania

If you are an adult (age>18) and suffer from the symptoms of hair pulling disorder (also known as trichotillomania), you are invited to complete an online survey about your symptoms as well as certain childhood experiences that some people have. This study is being conducted by the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology at Yeshiva University.  If you consent to participate in this study, you will complete a series of anonymous questionnaires that ask you questions about your childhood experiences and emotions.  The survey should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.  If you elect to participate you will have the option to be entered into a raffle for one of four $50 gift cards.  To learn more about the study, please click on this link.

 

Hair Pulling Urges and Everyday Urges 

We are interested in better understanding the nature of hair-pulling urges, and how these urges compare to other, everyday urges. If you experience hair-pulling urges, we invite you to participate in an online survey. You do not need to have been formally diagnosed with trichotillomania in order to participate. In this survey, you will have the chance to help us better understand what it is like to have hair-pulling urges and how these urges compare to everyday urges that people experience. The survey should take you about 30-35 minutes to complete, and your responses will be anonymous. If you wish to take a break in the middle of the survey, you may do so. You will be able to return to the survey where you left off by clicking on the survey link again (on the same computer and browser). Your responses will remain anonymous. To access the survey, click on the following link.

 

Intimacy in the Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum 

If you are an adult with OCD, Trichotillomania (i.e., hair-pulling), or Compulsive Skin Picking, you are invited to participate in a brief online survey conducted through the University of Houston-Clear Lake. With the information gathered from this survey, we hope to understand concerns related to intimacy with individuals presenting with these conditions. While there is no direct benefit to participants, the study hopes to better understand intimacy and whether it should be addressed in treatment for OCD, Trichotillomania, and Compulsive Skin Picking. The survey will take approximately 30 minutes to 1 hour to complete. All information provided will be kept completely anonymous. If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Chad Wetterneck at wetterneck@uhcl.edu or 281-283-3364. You can access the survey at the following link.